Expanding access to antiretroviral therapy in southern Africa and India: Implications for HIV prevention and care delivery in resource-limited settings

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Overview

Title
Expanding access to antiretroviral therapy in southern Africa and India: Implications for HIV prevention and care delivery in resource-limited settings
Contributors
Venkatesh, Kartik Kailas (creator)
lurie, mark (Director)
mayer, kenneth (Reader)
mcgarvey, stephen (Reader)
triche, elizabeth (Reader)
Brown University. BIOMED: Epidemiology (sponsor)
Doi
10.7301/Z0VD6WQD
Copyright Date
2011
Abstract
In light of the continued high incidence of HIV in resource-limited settings, this dissertation examines risk factors associated with HIV acquisition in at risk southern African women, sexual risk behaviors among HIV-infected men and women in care in South India and South Africa, and the impact of maternal HIV exposure on infant health in South Africa. This dissertation examines HIV infection within a life-course perspective, namely at the time of acquiring HIV, then living with HIV as a chronic disease, and finally the onward implications of HIV exposure on child health. Within a public health framework, these observational studies encompass primary prevention among women at risk for HIV infection, secondary prevention among HIV-infected individuals, and clinical outcomes among infants exposed to HIV. These findings have implications for informing new HIV prevention interventions, especially among women, and for the potential use of antiretroviral therapy for prevention in resource-limited settings.
Keywords
HIV
AIDS
prevention
sexual behavior
treatment
HIV (Viruses)
AIDS (Disease)
Notes
Thesis (Ph.D. -- Brown University (2011)
Extent
xvii, 298 p.

Citation

Venkatesh, Kartik Kailas, "Expanding access to antiretroviral therapy in southern Africa and India: Implications for HIV prevention and care delivery in resource-limited settings" (2011). Epidemiology Theses and Dissertations. Brown Digital Repository. Brown University Library. https://doi.org/10.7301/Z0VD6WQD

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