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Determining the Role of Neuronal Ramping Activity in Visual and Prefrontal Areas in a Working Memory Task

Description

Abstract:
Working memory, the short-term retention of information, is used on a daily basis. Remembering a ten-digit phone number long enough to write it down is one of the many everyday tasks that requires working memory. Despite its role in everyday life, the neural circuitry governing working memory is widely debated. Prefrontal cortex (PFC) has been causally linked to working memory, but new research suggests that sensory areas, such as visual cortex (V2), are also involved and interact with signals observed in PFC. In both areas, ramping, a sustained increase in neuronal firing, has been observed in working memory experiments on the individual cell level and the population level. The observed ramping signal may represent mental tracking of stored information, with neurons increasing in firing rate until recall is prompted. My UTRA will focus on the analysis of large-scale electrophysiological recordings from a non-human primate as she performed a working memory task in order to understand the neural mechanisms and brain areas involved in working memory.

Citation

Vankawala, Jay, "Determining the Role of Neuronal Ramping Activity in Visual and Prefrontal Areas in a Working Memory Task" (2020). Summer Research Symposium. Brown Digital Repository. Brown University Library. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:1139287/

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  • Summer Research Symposium

    Each year, Brown University showcases the research of its undergraduates at the Summer Research Symposium. More than half of the student-researchers are UTRA recipients, while others receive funding from a variety of Brown-administered and national programs and fellowships and go …
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