Evaluation of medicine retail outlets for sale of typhoid fever vaccine among adults in two urban and rural settings in western Kenya: a proof-of-concept study

Description

Abstract:
To evaluate the viability of the medicine outlet model, we partnered with nine outlets across urban and rural communities in western Kenya to sell a nurse-administered typhoid vaccine. Purchasers were surveyed to reveal market demographic characteristics, reasons for vaccine purchase, and sources of information about the program. Key informant interviews and focus group discussions defined acceptabiity, demand, and additional suggestions for improving this mechanism of selling and distributing vaccines. This study demonstrated a high demand for vaccines at community medicine outlets. Important insights on how to improve and sustain such a program included extension of distribution time, education of outlet keepers, and minimizing vaccine stockouts. With improved social marketing, infrastructure mapping, education and pricing schemes, medicine outlets could become a sustainable avenue for selling adult vaccines in emerging markets for both routine and pandemic vaccines.
Notes:
Scholarly concentration: Global Health
This study was carried out with funding from The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Grand Challenges Round 8 (LG-L) and the Summer Assistantship program at Alpert Medical School (JH)

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Citation

Ho, Julius, Odhiambo, Gladys, Meng'anyi, Lucy, et al., "Evaluation of medicine retail outlets for sale of typhoid fever vaccine among adults in two urban and rural settings in western Kenya: a proof-of-concept study" Warren Alpert Medical School Scholarly Concentrations Program Gallery of Scholarly Work. Brown Digital Repository. Brown University Library. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-016-1788-5

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