Skip to page navigation menu Skip entire header
Brown University
Skip 13 subheader links

A Research Study to Evaluate Whether Routine Healthcare Checkups can be used to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates

Description

Abstract:
Abstract of A RESEARCH STUDY TO EVALUATE WHETHER ROUTINE HEALTHCARE CHECKUPS CAN BE USED TO INCREASE COLORECTAL CANCER SCREENING RATES, by MIRIAM GEORGE, Degree MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH, Brown University, May 2021. Objective: 1) To identify characteristics of adults who are accessing colorectal cancer screening services. 2)To use subgroup analysis to identify the subset of the population that accesses preventive services, such as annual checkups, but avoid specific cancer screening services. Methods: The study made use of the 2018 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data, where over 2,57,000 U.S. residents are interviewed telephonically. Our study utilized variable selection methods such as StepAIC function, Lasso Regression and Ridge Regression. The three methods were compared using Area under the Curve (AUC) values. Finally, subgroup analysis was used to examine whether predictors of colorectal cancer screening were similar among those who had a checkup in the past 2 years versus those who did not get a checkup. Results: People who got a checkup in the past 2 years had a 75% increase in the odds of getting screened for colorectal cancer, compared to those people who didn’t get a checkup in the past 2 years in this sample [95% CI: 1.7 - 1.9]. Further, among people who got a routine checkup within the past 2 years, those with an inability to access healthcare due to cost had 10% decreased odds of accessing colorectal cancer screening, as compared to those without an inability to access healthcare due to cost [95% CI: 0.8- 0.9]. Conclusion: Participants who accessed prior preventive care services, during the previous 2 years or within a smaller time frame, have significantly higher colorectal cancer screening rates. The fact that variables associated with cost of screening, such as availability of healthcare coverage, income and employment, are significant predictors of colorectal cancer screening indicates that cost serves as a barrier to screening in this population. Therefore, we conclude that more policies should focus on providing free of cost or subsidized cost screening services. Policy Implications: The study suggests that policies that promote annual checkups and free access to them, could upsurge gains through early disease detection and improved health outcomes obtained through increased delivery of colorectal cancer screening.
Notes:
Thesis (M. P. H.)--Brown University, 2021

Citation

George, Miriam, "A Research Study to Evaluate Whether Routine Healthcare Checkups can be used to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates" (2021). Public Health Theses and Dissertations. Brown Digital Repository. Brown University Library. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:qpdmp2ys/

Relations

Collection: