Kingship and Collapse: Inequality and Identity in the Terminal Classic Southern Maya Lowlands

Full Metadata

Overview

Title
Kingship and Collapse: Inequality and Identity in the Terminal Classic Southern Maya Lowlands
Contributors
Carter, Nicholas Poole (creator)
Houston, Stephen (Director)
Scherer, Andrew (Reader)
Golden, Charles (Reader)
Garrison, Thomas (Reader)
Brown University. Anthropology (sponsor)
Doi
10.7301/Z0PG1Q3H
Copyright Date
2014
Abstract
In polities headed by divine kings, the public performance of hierarchy and inequality is essential to political power. Yet what happens to that inequality when political institutions break down? This dissertation investigates how hierarchy was constituted and contested during one such period: the Terminal Classic phase (ca. A.D. 800 - 1000) of southern lowland Maya civilization, when populations declined and existing dynastic kingdoms dissolved. The dissertation explores Terminal Classic hieroglyphic and visual representations of sociopolitical hierarchy and investigates archaeological data from the site of El Zotz, Guatemala, and elsewhere in search of evidence for the persistence and nature of social inequality during the Maya collapse.
Keywords
collapse
inequality
elite
king
kingship
Terminal Classic
state
hierarchy
El Zotz
epigraphy
Mayas
Hieroglyphics
Equality
Elite (Social sciences)
Monuments
Archaeology
Inscriptions
Notes
Thesis (Ph.D. -- Brown University (2014)
Extent
23, 716 p.

Citation

Carter, Nicholas Poole, "Kingship and Collapse: Inequality and Identity in the Terminal Classic Southern Maya Lowlands" (2014). Anthropology Theses and Dissertations. Brown Digital Repository. Brown University Library. https://doi.org/10.7301/Z0PG1Q3H

Relations

Collection: