Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to Understand Intentions to Perform Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Among College Students

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Overview

Title
Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to Understand Intentions to Perform Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Among College Students
Contributors
Magid, Kate (creator)
Risica, Patricia (Advisor)
Ranney, Megan (Reader)
Brown University. School of Public Health (sponsor)
Doi
10.26300/pftd-z938
Copyright Date
2018
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to use the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to explain health behaviors performed by university students. In the review component of this project, the TPB was applied to behaviors related to alcohol use, drug use, tobacco use, diet, exercise, condom use, sleep, vaccinations, and mental health treatment. In the study component of this project, the TPB was used to explain what motivates bystanders to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on a cardiac arrest victim. The objective of the study was to determine the extent to which the TPB accounts for variability in intention to perform CPR; to explore which constructs in the TPB significantly and most strongly predict intention to perform CPR; and to examine sex-based differences in TPB constructs and intention to perform CPR among college students. In the study, 588 undergraduate students responded to a cross-sectional TPB survey about performing CPR. Based on multivariate linear regression analyses, attitude was the strongest predictor of intention to perform CPR ( = 0.381, p<0.001), followed by subjective norm ( = 0.303, p<0.001), and perceived behavioral control ( =0.167, p<0.001). The TPB accounted for 51% of the variance in intention to perform CPR (F[3, 536]=186, p<0.001). There were no sex-based differences in intention to perform CPR. This research has implications for designing CPR trainings. Specifically, resuscitation trainings that highlight positive outcomes and social norms associated with performing CPR may help bystanders form intentions to perform CPR, and may increase the likelihood that they will perform CPR in an emergency.
Keywords
College students
Behavioral theory
theory of planned behavior
CPR (First aid)
Notes
Thesis (M. P. H.)--Brown University, 2018
Extent
6, 71 p.

Citation

Magid, Kate, "Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to Understand Intentions to Perform Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Among College Students" (2018). Public Health Theses and Dissertations. Brown Digital Repository. Brown University Library. https://doi.org/10.26300/pftd-z938

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