Dostoevsky's Influence on Modernism and Its Applications for Comparative Literary Analysis

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Title
Dostoevsky's Influence on Modernism and Its Applications for Comparative Literary Analysis
Contributors
Luo, Katherine (creator)
Armstrong, Paul (thesis advisor)
Nabers, Deak (reader)
Golstein, Vladimir (reader)
Brown University. English (sponsor)
Doi
10.26300/ncah-jr68
Copyright Date
2019
Abstract
Actively writing from the mid-1800s until his death in 1881, Dostoevsky produced critically introspective works such as Notes From Underground, Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, and his magnum opus, The Brothers Karamazov, decades before the commonly understood origin point of modernism. This thesis will argue firstly that Dostoevsky's works share significant devices with modernist texts, including the stream of consciousness, abstraction of reality, and the rewriting of canonical cultural and literary elements. I will then argue that such similarities emerged from commonalities between Dostoevsky and the modernists' social circumstances, including rapid urbanization, intense violence, and the departure from the concept of God as a sovereign figure. I will conclude that because of these similarities, we can not only understand modernists texts through new lenses, but also see ways in which new novels today continue to be inspired, thematically and stylistically, by events similar to those that influenced Dostoevsky and the modernists.
Keywords
Russia
Christianity
Religion
Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881
Modernism (Literature)
Hemingway, Ernest, 1899-1961
Faulkner, William, 1897-1962
Joyce, James, 1882-1941
Crime and Punishment
Notes from underground
Brothers Karamazov
Urbanization
Notes
Senior thesis (AB)--Brown University, 2019
Concentration: English

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Luo, Katherine, "Dostoevsky's Influence on Modernism and Its Applications for Comparative Literary Analysis" (2019). English Theses and Dissertations. Brown Digital Repository. Brown University Library. https://doi.org/10.26300/ncah-jr68

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