Biodissolution and cellular response to MoO3 nanoribbons and a new framework for early hazard screening for 2D materials.

Description

Abstract:
Two-dimensional materials are a class of ultra-thin but highly functional materials that promise improvements in semiconductor electronics, energy capture and storage, or catalysis, as compared to traditional materials. The fiber- or plate-like shape and nanosize thickness of these materials raises questions regarding their fate, toxicity and risk throughout production and use. Here we present a framework to evaluate the potential hazard of 2D materials, considering both biopersistence and cytotoxicity. The aim of this approach is to rapidly identify and prioritize materials with the highest potential risk for more detailed study. A novel 2D material, MoO3 was evaluated using the framework, and determined to be of low priority for further evaluation due to its rapid degradation into low-hazard dissolution products.
Notes:
This research was supported by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Superfund Research Program of the National Institutes of Health under award number P42ES013660.

Citation

Evan Gray, Browning, Cynthia, Wang, Mengjing, et al., "Biodissolution and cellular response to MoO3 nanoribbons and a new framework for early hazard screening for 2D materials." (2018). Brown Superfund Project 4: Nanomaterial Design for Environmental Health and Safety, Brown Superfund Presentations & Publications, Kane Lab Publications, Brown Superfund Project 2: Adverse Human Health Impacts of Nanomaterials Digital Archive. Brown Digital Repository. Brown University Library. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:840912/

Relations

Collections: